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Events

 

Upcoming Events

 

Fourth Annual Amazon-PIRE Meeting


When: Thursday, November 3, 2011, 12-2 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: From sub-Andean lakes in Peru to lowland terra firme forests in Brazil, to the tropical biome of Biosphere 2, our Amazon-PIRE students continue to be very busy! Join us and learn all about Amazon-PIRE/PASI travels and research during the past year! Agenda includes:

  • Field reports and slide show on the Amazon-PIRE/PASI course at Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station and Tambopata National Reserve in Peru
  • Research results overview – Amazon-PIRE students, post-docs, and colleagues
  • Research and education directions of Amazon-PIRE for the coming year and beyond, including plans with Biosphere 2 and the

        BioMe project.

 

Continuing Events

 

Biosphere 2 Rainforest Tours

When: 2009-present
Where: University of Arizona, Biosphere 2
Overview: When Joost van Haren is not engaged in field work in Brazil, he gives bi-weekly rainforest tours to the public to explain ongoing research activities and how the Biosphere 2 rainforest is an essential component of the Amazon-PIRE Program.  Joost van Haren is a former PIRE Fellow and has lectured and mentored students at Amazon-PIRE Field Courses 2008, 2009, 2010 and the PASI-PIRE Field Course 2011

 

Past Events

 

Hinsby Cadillo-Quiroz, Arizona State University: Seminar: Methanogens in Northern Peatlands: Ecology and Community Patterns

When: Monday, October 10, 4-5 p.m.
Where: BioSciences West, Room 208
Overview: Hinsby Cadillo-Quiroz, postdoctoral fellow at Arizona State University discussed "Methanogens in Northern Peathlands: Ecology and Community Patterns."  Dr. Cadillo-Quiroz attended the 2011 Amazon-PIRE/PASI field course in Peru.

 

PASI-PIRE Field Course 2011

When: June 28-July 15, 2011
Where: Peru
Overview: Amazon-PIRE offered a Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) at the Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station and Tambopata National Reserve, Peru. 

http://amazonpire.org/oppor-field11.html

 

Brian Chaszar: Final Oral Examination

When: Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 10:00 a.m.

Where: Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: Brian Chaszar, a Master of Science candidate at the University of Arizona in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, defended his thesis entitled “Maintaining Balance in a Changing World: An Examination of the Physiological Mechanism of Drought Mortality in Eucalyptus sideroxylon."  Brian Chaszar was a PIRE fellow and attended the Amazon-PIRE Field Course in 2009.

Joost van Haren: Dissertation Defense

When: Friday, April 15, 2011, 11:00 a.m.

Where: Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: Joost van Haren, a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona in Soil, Water, and Environmental Science, defended his dissertation entitled “Spatial and temporal variability of soil CO2 and N2O fluxes in tropical forest soils: the influence of tree species, precipitation and soil texture.” Joost van Haren is a former PIRE Fellow and has lectured and mentored students at Amazon-PIRE Field Courses 2008, 2009, 2010 and the PASI-PIRE Field Course 2011..

 

LBA-DMIP Workshop

When:   April 18-19, 2011
Where:  University of Arizona, Biosphere 2
Overview:  The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) Experiment in Amazônia-Data Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP) hosted a workshop for biosphere-atmosphere modeling researchers.

Workshop Registration:  http://amazonpire.org/apo/

Participants and Agenda

Amazon-PIRE Symposium and Planning Workshop

When:  April 25-26, 2011
Where: University of Arizona, Biosphere 2
Overview: 

A symposium (day 1) to share and review results and findings that we have learned about: 

     --the response of Amazon forests to climatic variability (drought), using eddy flux towers, satellites,

        forest inventories, and ecophysiology

     --using LIDAR to characterize forest biomass, disturbance, and to learn about the relation

        between forest physical structure and function

     --using atmospheric measurements of CO2 (from aircraft) and VOC's  and aerosols (from towers) to understand forest function

     --using Biosphere 2's tropical rainforest biome as an experimental test of our understanding

and a workshop (day 2) to plan next steps for research and for funding.

     --what are the most interesting new science questions that should focus our next phase of work?

     --what collaborations (with scientists and with funders) can we sustain and build?

     --how do we strengthen institutional ties between U.S. and Brazilian partners, especially to support exchanges?

Symposium and Workshop Registration:  http://amazonpire.org/apo/

Participants and Agenda

 

Joost van Haren - Lecture Series

When: March 12, 2011, 12:00 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, Biosphere 2
Overview: Joost van Haren spoke about "How do tropical ecosystems respond to drought?"  Several global climate change models have predicted that the Amazon basin will become drier in the near future.  What does this mean for the vast Amazon basin tropical forests?  In this installment of the Environment and Sustainability Portal lectures, van Haren discussed what will happen to tropical rainforests when the amount of rainfall is reduced and what experiments and observations the science community is using to predict how tropical trees will respond to this change.  Joost van Haren is a former PIRE Fellow and has lectured and mentored students at Amazon-PIRE Field Courses 2008, 2009, 2010 and the PASI-PIRE Field Course 2011.  Biosphere 2 Let's Talk Science

National Science Foundation- Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program

When: February 15-16, 2011
Where: Arlington, VA
Overview: NSF PIRE Principal Investigator Meeting and Symposium.  The theme of the symposium was “International Research Partnerships: Globalizing US Science and Education."  Scott R. Saleska, Director of Amazon-PIRE and Associate Professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of Arizona, gave a presentation entitled: "Global Issues and Basic Research: The Future of Amazonian Forests in a Changing Climate."

 

Paper Writing Workshop

When: December 12-21, 2010
Where: Adolpho Ducke Reserve, near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil
Overview: Workshop for discussion and finalizing of papers to be published about collected vegetation data.

 

Rafael Rosolem: Dissertation Defense

When: Friday, November 5, 2010, 9:00 a.m, 2010
Where: Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: Rafael Rosolem, a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona in Hydrology and Water Resources,defended his dissertation entitled “Land Surface Processes in Natural and Artificial Tropical Ecosystems.” Rafael Rosolem attended the Amazon-PIRE Field Course 2008.


Third Annual Amazon-PIRE Meeting

When: Tuesday, October 12, 2-3:30 p.m., 2010
Where: University of Arizona, Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: From sub-Andean lakes in Peru to lowland terra firme forests in Brazil, to the tropical biome of Biosphere 2, our Amazon-PIRE students continue to be very busy! Join us and learn all about Amazon-PIRE travels and research during the past year! Agenda includes:

  • Field reports and slide show on the third annual PIRE course in the Adolpho Ducke and Cuieiras Forest Reserves, and at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP).
  • Research results overview – Amazon-PIRE students, post-docs, and colleagues
  • Research and education directions of Amazon-PIRE for the coming year and beyond, including plans with Biosphere 2 and the

        BioMe project.

University of Arizona Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department Seminar

When: Monday, September 20, 4 p.m., 2010.
Where: University of Arizona, Family and Consumer Sciences, Room 101
Overview: Scott R. Saleska, Director of the Amazon-PIRE Program and Assistant Professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, presented a seminar entitled "Carbon cycle feedbacks to climate from the Amazon to the Arctic: does ecology matter?"
http://www.eebweb.arizona.edu/news/monday_seminar_new.asp

American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting of the Americas

When: August 8-12, 2010
Where: Foz do Iguassu, Brazil
Overview: Amazon-PIRE presenters at this meeting included Dr. Natalia Restrepo-Coupe and Bradley Christofferson.

Ecological Society of America (ESA) Annual Meeting, 2010

When: August 1-6, 2010
Where: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Overview: Amazon-PIRE presenters at this meeting included Bradley Christoffersen, Scott Stark, and Tara Woodcock.

EsecaFlor Presentation and Tour

When: July 23, 2010

Where: Portel, Pará, Brazil

Overview: Joost van Haren, Amazon-PIRE Fellow, gave a presentation and tour of the EsecaFlor experiment in Caxiuanã, Brazil to a student group from Portel Community College in Portel, Pará, Brazil.

Field Course 2010

When: June 27-July 9, 2010
Where: Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil
Overview: The third annual Amazon-PIRE field course took place at the Adolpho Ducke Reserve, the Cuieiras Reserve, and the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP), near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

LBA-DMIP Meeting

When: June 21-22, 2010
Where: Natal, Brazil
Overview: Amazon-PIRE presenters at this meeting included Dr. Natalia Restrepo-Coupe and Bradley Christoffersen.

Luciana F. Alves, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR): Seminar: "Long-term Growth Suppression in Tropical Tree Saplings: a 10-year Study"

When: May 27, 2010, 2:00 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, BioSciences West, Room 302
Overview: Luciana F. Alves, Research Associate, presented a seminar discussing her evaluation of sapling growth and microsite conditions (light) of four common, non-pioneer tree species of the Atlantic forest in SE Brazil and their very slow annual diameter increments after 10 years, despite increases in crown light conditions.

Amazon-Andes Workshop

When: May 16-22, 2010
Where: Cusco, Peru
Overview: Amazon-PIRE presenters at this meeting included Dr. Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Bradley Christoffersen and Thomas Powell.

Amazon-PIRE LIDAR Paper Writing Workshop and Organizational Meeting

When: May 9-13, 2010
Where: University of Arizona, Biosphere 2
Overview: Workshop and meeting focused on analyzing the 2008 Amazon aerial LIDAR dataset and discussion of possible papers.

Kyle Dexter, Université Paul Sabatier: Seminar: “Community assembly and climatic adaptation of Amazonian trees”

When: Monday, May 3, 2010, 2:00-3:00 p.m.
Where: Biosciences West, Room 302
Overview: Kyle Dexter, Post-doctoral Fellow at the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, France presented a seminar entitled: “Community assembly and climatic adaptation of Amazonian trees” Dr. Dexter reviewed a series of studies focused on the assembly of communities of the tropical tree genus Inga (Fabaceae) in Amazonian Peru as well as discussed his recent research on the evolution of climatic adaptation in tropical trees.

Scott R. Saleska: Seminar: “The once (and future?) forest: vegetation-climate feedbacks in the Amazon Basin.”

When: Monday, April 26, 2010
Where: California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA
Overview: Scott R. Saleska, Director of the Amazon-PIRE Program at the University of Arizona, was invited to present a seminar at the California Institute of Technology. The title of the seminar was “The once (and future?) forest: vegetation-climate feedbacks in the Amazon Basin.”

Geodaze Symposium

When: April 1-3, 2010
Where: University of Arizona, Arizona History Museum
Overview: Sarah White, Amazon-PIRE Fellow, presented a poster entitled: "Precipitation Variability in the Peruvian Amazon: at the 38th Annual Geosciences Symposium, a student-organized showcase of graduate and undergraduate research in the earth sciences.

Juan Camilo Villegas: Dissertation Defense

When: Friday, March 26, 2010 at 10:00 a.m.
Where: Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: Juan Camilo Villegas, a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, defended his dissertation entitled “The partitioning of evapotranspiration along the grassland-forest continuum: Ecohydrological implications of microclimatic trends and non-linear response to amount of woody plant cover.” Juan Camilo Villegas attended the Amazon-PIRE Field Course 2009.

Tropical Phenology Modeling/Monitoring Planning Meeting

When: March 23, 2010
Where: University of Arizona, BioSciences West, Room 102
Overview: On-going collaborative work plans include combining angular light intensity profile measurements through time with LIDAR-derived canopy structure and the FLiES radiative transfer model to upscale photosynthesis in the Tapajós flux tower footprint.

Visit of Jorge Almeida Guimarães, President of CAPES

When: Friday, February 26, 2010
Where: University of Arizona
Overview: Dr. Jorge Almeida Guimarães, President of CAPES, the Brazilian Federal Agency for Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education, visited the University of Arizona at the invitation of the University of Arizona Office of Western Hemispheric Programs, the Graduate College and the Center for Latin American Studies. Dr. Guimarães gave a presentation entitled: “Issues and Trends in Brazilian Graduate Education: Opportunities for Collaboration with the U.S.” Dr. Guimarães also toured Biosphere 2.

Amazon-PIRE Field Campaign

When: November-December 2009
Where: Tapajós National Forest, Santarém, Pará, Brazil
Overview: A team of 10 PIRE participants from the U.S. and Brazil worked 6 weeks, climbing trees in the Tapajós Forest to measure leaf traits.
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/amazonie-enchantee

 

Miles Elementary Exploratory Learning Center Presentation

When: November 17, 2009
Where: Miles Elementary, 1400 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson, AZ
Overview: Joost van Haren, Amazon-PIRE Fellow, gave a presentation to 1st and 2nd class students about the Amazon rainforest.

Amazon-Andes Project Meeting

When: November 16-18, 2009
Where: Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Overview: Workshop in Ouro Preto on modeling ecosystem response to climate change. Amazon-PIRE’s collaboration with the Amazon-Andes project.  http://www.oeb.harvard.edu/faculty/moorcroft/andes-amazon/index.html

“Music of the Sphere”

When: Friday, November 6, 2009
Where: Mesa Arts Center, Mesa, AZ
Overview: Pianist Simone Gorete Machado, in conjunction with Dr. Scott Saleska, Director of the U.S. National Science Foundation Amazon-PIRE Program presented classical works inspired by the sights and sounds of the rainforest.

The Second Annual UofA Amazon-PIRE Fall Meeting

When: Tuesday , October 22, 2009, 12-1:30 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: From sub-Andean lakes in Peru to lowland terra firme forests in Brazil, our Amazon-PIRE students have been busy! Join us for lunch and learn all about their travels and research during the past year. Agenda includes:

  • Field reports and slide show on the second annual PIRE course in the Caxiuanã National Forest
  • Research results overview Amazon-PIRE students, post-docs, and colleagues
  • Research and education directions of Amazon-PIRE for the coming year and beyond, including plans with: Biosphere 2, BioMe project.

Field Course in Caxiuanã, Brazil

When: July 19-29, 2009
Where: Caxiuanã, Pará, Brazil
Overview: The second annual Amazon-PIRE field course took place at the Museu Goeldi Ferreira Penna Field Research Station in the Caxiuanã National Forest, Pará, Brazil.

Tara Massad, Tulane University: Seminar: The Chemical Ecology of Tropical Reforestation

When: Friday, May 29, 2009, 10:00 a.m.
Where: BioSciences West, Room 302
Overview: Tara Massad, a PIRE postdoctoral candidate who is completing her PhD at Tulane University, discussed her dissertation research regarding the chemical ecology of tropical reforestation.

Uromi Goodale, Yale University: Seminar: The ecophysiology of pioneer tree species in relation to their disturbance ecology in wet lowland rainforest, Sri Lanka

When: Monday, May 18, 2009, 1:00 p.m.
Where: BioSciences West
Overview: Uromi Goodale, PIRE postdoctoral candidate, discussed her dissertation research of the ecophysiology of pioneer tree species in relation to their disturbance ecology in the wet lowland rainforest of Sri Lanka.

Elizabeth Lyons, Program Coordinator with NSF will speak about: "How to Secure NSF Funding for International Collaborations"

When: Thursday, March 26, 2009, 1:00 p.m.
Where: Louise Foucar Marshall Building, Room 531
Overview: Dr. Elizabeth Lyons is the Program Coordinator for the Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program in NSF's Office of International Science and Engineering. Dr. Lyons gave a special mid-day seminar entitled: "How to Secure NSF Funding for International Collaborations." Following the seminar, Dr. Lyons met with students who have international education or research experience.

A Community Workshop: How can we best use the Biosphere 2 Tropical Rainforest to advance understanding of tropical forest function under climate change?

When:Friday, March 6 & Saturday, March 7, 2009
Where: University of Arizona Biosphere 2, Oracle, AZ
Workshop

Survival of the Sphere? Rainforest Notes

When:Thursday, March 5, 2009
Where: 1) Science Seminar: What is the Future of Tropical Forests under Climate Change? 3:30pm - 4:30pm Louise Foucar Marshall Building, Room 531 2) Narrative and Musical Performance 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. UA School of Music, Room 232
Free to the public! Light refreshments will be served before the performance.

Overview:
This was a special two-part event exploring the science and cultural aspects of tropical rainforests under climate change. Deborah Clark, world-renowned tropical ecologist kicked off the event at 3:30 p.m. with a seminar entitled: What is the Future of Tropical Forests under Climate Change? Following was an evocative performance by Brazilian classical pianist Simone Gorete Machado and University of Arizona ecologist Scott R. Saleska. This project was been made possible by Biosphere 2, The UA School of Music, NSF Amazon-PIRE and The Institute for Environment and Society.

Celebration for Charles Darwin's Birthday

When:Thursday, February 12, 2009
Where: UA Student Union Memorial Ballroom, 3pm-5pm
Overview: This celebration of Darwin's birthday included a birthday cake, science demonstration booths, music, and Darwin poetry readings. Sponsored by the University of Arizona (UA) Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, the Poetry Center, the UA Bookstore, & others at UA.

"Music of the Sphere"

When: Sunday, January 25, 2009
Where: The University of Arizona Biosphere 2, Oracle, AZ. Directions
Overview: The University of Arizona Biosphere 2 presented "Music of the Sphere", the first in a series of fine arts performances. This celebration of the Brazilian Rainforest featured a kaleidoscope of music, beginning with the eclectic REVEILLE MENS CHORUS, who performed in Brazil in 2005. Pianist Simone Gorete Machado, in conjunction with Dr. Scott R. Saleska, Director of the U.S. National Science Foundation Amazon-PIRE Program, presented classical works inspired by the sights and sounds of the rainforest. The dynamic guitar duo BRAZUKAS entertained on the beach and the infectious rhythms of the Brazilian dance band SAMBALANCO finished the afternoon. These performances provided a perfect complement to the guided tour of this wondrous space where science, and now the arts, lives.

First Annual International Amazon-PIRE Meeting, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

When: November 18, 2008
Where: Studio 5 Convention Center, Rio Negro Room
Overview: Report on first year activities and plans for the future
http://www.lbaconferencia.org/lbaconf_2008/eng/assoc_mtgs.htm

International Scientific Conference in Brazil: Amazon in Perspective – Integrated Science for a Sustainable Future

When: November 17-20, 2008
Where: Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.
Overview: The conference called together current major research programs in the Amazon, including LBA (Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Project in the Amazon), GEOMA (Amazonian Environmental Modeling Network) and PPBio (Biodiversity Research Program). The focus of the conference was to foment an active debate emphasizing synergy and cooperation and integration of research that will result in an interdisciplinary analysis of current and future scenarios of environmental changes in the Amazon.

In disseminating the latest results on biodiversity, climate and land-use-cover research in the Amazon, as well as discussing and analyzing various scenarios of environment change caused by deforestation and climate change, the hope is to identify new strategies and priorities, both for research planning for the region and for actions supporting sustainable development.
http://www.lbaconferencia.org/lbaconf_2008/eng/index.htm

 

The first annual UofA Amazon-PIRE fall meeting

When: Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008, 1:30–3:00 p.m.
Where: Marshall Bldg, SAHRA, Room 531
Refreshments will be served!
What: Come and hear what Amazon-PIRE students and colleagues have been up to (and get to know them if you haven't met), and let's make plans for the coming year. Agenda includes:

  • Report on the first Annual PIRE course from students and teachers
  • Report on research progress from Amazon-PIRE students and post-docs
  • Discussion of research directions (including in Biosphere 2!) for the coming year and beyond

Mark Bush, Florida Institute of Technology: "Revisiting Virginity: Is Amazonia a cultural landscape? (or what was the level of pre-Columbian disturbance in Amazonia?)"

What: ISPE Brown Bag talk
When: Tuesday, Oct 21, 2008, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Where: Large ISPE meeting room

Mark Bush, Florida Institute of Technology: "Ice-age aridity in Amazonia and the refuge hypothesis for tropical diversity: Can you hear the fat lady singing?"

What: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology departmental seminar
When: Monday, Oct 20, 2008, 4-5 p.m.
Where: Biosciences West room 301

Lianhong Gu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Scientist, spoke about: "The keeper and breaker of the global carbon cycle since the industrial revolution"

When: Wednesday, March 12, 2008, 3 p.m.
Where: Marshall Building, Room 531.
What: Dr. Lianhong Gu is a R&D Staff Scientist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division who specializes in carbon cycle. Dr. Lianhong Gu gave an informal seminar entitled "The keeper and breaker of the global carbon cycle since the industrial revolution".
Abstract: Terrestrial and oceanic sinks currently absorb a substantial portion of the industrial carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere, preventing the realization of the full climatic impact of fossil-fuel emissions. The dynamics of these sinks critically influence the future trajectory of climate change. There have been growing concerns on the potential weakening of terrestrial carbon sinks due to autumn warming, droughts, wild fires, and deforestation and of oceanic sinks due to the reduced carbonate buffering capacity and climate change. In this talk, I will show that the global carbon sink strength (GCSS, the annual sum of net oceanic and terrestrial sinks with land-use emissions included) has been accelerating since 1900 up to the present (2006), following a relatively stable period of small global source since the industrial revolution (~ 1750). A very tight linear relationship exists between GCSS and atmospheric CO2 for the whole 256-year period. However, the partition of GCSS into land and oceanic sink components and land-use emissions indicates that the carbon uptake by undisturbed terrestrial ecosystems may have already saturated with respect to rising atmospheric CO2. In addition to the long-term trend, I will show that the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991 had a huge impact on the global carbon cycle and was responsible for the two largest carbon uptake records ever observed since the industrial revolution.

Brad Christoffersen (University of Arizona and Amazon- PIRE) spoke at the UA EEB departmental seminar on: "How important is root functioning for modeling of water,energy, and carbon fluxes across Amazonia?"

When: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department (EEB) Tuesday Noon Seminar Series, Tuesday, March 5, 2008, 12:30 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, BioSciences West, Room 208.
What: UA EEB graduate student and Amazon-PIRE fellow Brad Christoffersen spoke about: "How important is root functioning for modeling of water,energy, and carbon fluxes across Amazonia?"
Abstract: Amazon forests play a central role in maintaining global climate stability as a potent driver of the hydrological cycle and as a large store of carbon. Recent work in land surface models has linked deep roots and hydraulic redistribution by roots (HR) in the Amazon basin to significant improvements in model predictions of water and carbon fluxes, and hence global climate. More recently, model revisions of parameterizations of belowground hydrology have produced similar improvements. While such modifications produce qualitatively similar results, they represent different belowground mechanisms which I propose to assess under simultaneous incorporation into a land surface model. A factorial model experiment driven by observed meteorology at a network of sites will help tease apart the relative role of revised hydrology, deep roots and HR. Model results will then be compared to a multi-year dataset from a network of eight eddy covariance measures of water, energy, and carbon balance in the Amazon, bounding a large range of vegetation types, precipitation seasonality, and land uses. This work is the first to intercompare different belowground mechanisms of root functioning in light of recent improvements to model hydrology, and will contribute to a more accurate representation of biogeophysics and carbon cycling in coupled models.

International Workshop in Brazil: Interactions Between Climate,Forests, and Land Use in the Amazon Basin: Modeling and Mitigating Large-Scale Savannization

When: Monday, February 25-Tuesday, February 26, 2008.
Where: Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.
Who: Dr. Michael T. Coe and Dr.Daniel C. Nepstad, Woods Hole Research Center, organized this 2008 NSF/Moore Modeling Workshop.
Wendy Kingerlee, wkingerlee@whrc.org, was in charge of logistics.

Workshop Overview: The purpose of the workshop, entitled "Interactions Between Climate, Forests, and Land Use in the Amazon Basin: Modeling and Mitigating Large-Scale Savannization", was to review the state of our knowledge of these interactions in the Amazon and to design a science plan that could significantly narrow the gaps in this knowledge.
This workshop was hosted by the Woods Hole Research Center and sponsored by the United States National Science Foundation and the Moore Foundation.

International Workshop in Brazil: Aerosols in the Amazon - Changes and their Consequences from Past and Future Human Activities

When: Monday, February 18-Friday, February 22, 2008.
Where: Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.
Who: Dr. Scot Martin (chair), Harvard University's David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS) and Dr. Paulo Artaxo, University of Sao Paulo (USP), among others, organized this international workshop. Please refer to its website for more information.
Workshop Overview and Goals: Amazonian aerosol particles (including their formation, transformations, and effects on clouds and radiation) are very important as a climate regulator in the southern hemisphere. Therefore, understanding the effects on them of past and future human activities is a priority for planning strategies to mitigate the impacts of climate change. The goals of the workshop were to define research priorities, consider new research approaches, and address mechanisms for international collaboration, in particular to past and future changes arising from human activities, especially as tied to economic development plans for the region.

Informal meeting at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting to discuss LBA-MIP

Where: Buena Vista Meeting Room, The Galleria Park Hotel, 191 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94104
What: Informal meeting with refreshments at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting to discuss progress and next steps for the LBA Model Biogeochemical/Vegetation Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) for the Amazon of South America. This project was created to bring together modeling groups to promote understanding on how the different models simulate the ecosystems and biogeophysical processes within LBA. This initiative is led by Luis Gustavo de Goncalves, Inez Fung, Humberto da Rocha and Scott R. Saleska.

Paul Moorcroft (Harvard University and Amazon-PIRE) spoke at the UA EEB departmental seminar on: "How close are we to a predictive science of the biosphere?"

When: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department (EEB) Monday Seminar Series, Monday, November 26, 2007, 4:30 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, Biosciences West, Room 301.
What: Dr. Paul Moorcroft is a Professor of Biology at Harvard University who specializes in terrestrial ecosystem dynamics and the response of terrestrial ecosystems to global change.

Joost van Haren (University of Arizona and Amazon- PIRE) spoke at the UA EEB departmental seminar on: "Influence of tropical tree species on soil biogeochemistry"

When: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department (EEB) Tuesday Noon Seminar Series, Tuesday, November 16th, 2007, 12:30 p.m.
Where: University of Arizona, BioSciences West, Room 208.
What: UA graduate student Joost van Haren spoke about "Influence of tropical tree species on soil biogeochemistry".

Celebration of International Collaboration at Biosphere 2

The Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department (EEB) and Biosphere 2 celebrated international collaboration, showcasing the PIRE Program in Amazon - Climate Interactions during the UA International Education Week 2007.
When: Friday a.m., November 16th, 2007.
Where: Tropical Forest Biome of Biosphere 2 (Vans left the UA Main Campus at 9:20 am for the Biosphere 2 and returned at 2:20 pm.)
What: Our research team offered a tour of Biosphere 2 (B2), focusing on how B2 Tropical Forest Biome will contribute to our Partnership for International Research and Education in the Amazon of Brazil.